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Gamme de tailles

Women
  • INT XXS XS S M L XL
    Poitrine
    (cm)
    74
    à
    77
    78
    à
    81
    82
    à
    85
    86
    à
    89
    90
    à
    93
    94
    à
    97
    Taille
    (cm)
    59
    à
    62
    63
    à
    66
    67
    à
    70
    71
    à
    74
    75
    à
    78
    79
    à
    82
    Hanches
    (cm)
    83
    à
    86
    87
    à
    90
    91
    à
    94
    95
    à
    98
    99
    à
    102
    103
    à
    107
  • INT XXS XS S M L XL
    GER 32 34 36 38 40 42
    US 0-2 4 6 8 10 12
    UK 6 8 10 12 14 16
    ITA 38 40 42 44 46 48
    FRA 34 36 38 40 42 44
    JAP 5 7 9 11 13 15
Men
  • INT XS S M L XL XXL
    Poitrine
    (cm)
    86
    à
    89
    90
    à
    93
    94
    à
    97
    98
    à
    101
    102
    à
    105
    106
    à
    109
    Taille
    (cm)
    73
    à
    76
    77
    à
    80
    81
    à
    84
    85
    à
    88
    89
    à
    92
    93
    à
    96
    Hanches
    (cm)
    87
    à
    90
    91
    à
    94
    95
    à
    98
    99
    à
    102
    103
    à
    106
    107
    à
    109
  • INT XS S M L XL XXL
    GER 44 46 48 50 52 54
    US 34 36 38 40 42 44
    UK 34 36 38 40 42 44
    ITA 44 46 48 50 52 54
    FRA 38 40 42 44 46 48
    JAP 1 2 3 4 5 6
  • CM 72 77 82 87 92
    INCH 28 30 32 34 36

    (Valeur approx.)

The blue page:
Denim news

Eco-friendly
dyeing methods

Text by Laura Reinke

On our BLUE PAGE, we write about all things denim. Since we started our eco-denim line A BETTER BLUE in 2018, we’re constantly on the lookout for innovative sustainable materials and techniques – to save even more water, electricity, chemicals and emissions when making our jeans. That’s why we were really excited when learning about a new low-impact way to dye our denim (and other fabrics!) with natural dyes – almost every colour is possible! We asked our very own denim developer and sustainability expert Uwe Kippschnieder a few questions about this process – and he also explains other eco-friendly dyeing methods in use for A BETTER BLUE.

Interview with denim expert Uwe Kippschnieder

Uwe Kippschnieder is Closed’s Denim Developer. He knows everything about denim – that’s why we call him our “walking denim lexicon” or simply refer to him as Dr. Denim. Uwe joined our company in 2002 and his passion for denim has been growing ever since. He is fascinated by sustainable denim innovations and is always pushing them vigorously for Closed. Inspired by his regular visits to weaving mills and laundries in Italy, he developed our eco-friendly denim line A BETTER BLUE with the clear message: style and eco-awareness can go hand in hand.

What are the sustainable advantages of using natural dyes?

Natural dyes use natural pigments instead of chemicals. They are more sustainable than conventional dyes from start to finish. No harmful chemicals are involved in the creation of the dye. In the dyeing process of the garments later on, less energy and less water are required. The wastewater does not contain any chemicals, which makes water treatment much easier, again saving energy. The dyeing process alone needs 30 per cent less water, 70 per cent less energy and 40 per cent chemicals in comparison to conventional dyeing. By using natural dyes, we can lower the environmental impact of our garments tremendously – for example, for a pair of jeans we achieved an EIM score of 8 instead of 14 after switching to natural dyes. Some information on the EIM score while we are at it: the Environmental Impact Measurement system by Jeanologia, a Spanish company for sustainable textile solutions, monitors the impact of garment finishing processes to improve their environmental performance, taking into consideration water and energy consumption, chemical impact and workers’ health. The lower the score (between 0 and 100), the better and more eco-friendly. Every pair of our A BETTER BLUE jeans has an EIM score below 33, which means “low-impact”. Having these kinds of objective, comparable numbers is important to us as they help us to further improve and track our progress.

Where are the natural dyes obtained?

Natural dyes are either mineral-based or plant-based. Mineral-based pigments are obtained in quarries, in our case in Italy, Cyprus or Morocco. As the pigments are very intense, only a very small amount is needed – so the environment is not harmed during this process. Plant-based dyes are obtained from bark, vegetables or dye plants such as curcuma. Many plant-based dyes even upcycle food waste, for example orange peel or nutshells, which is great as there is a steady supply without needing new resources. And there is even another advantage for some botanical dyes: the pulp, which remains after the dyeing process, can be reused as fertiliser. So far, we use the mineral dyes for denim – their colourfastness and resistance to fading are great. The botanical dyes are not used for denim, but mainly for jersey and nylon. We will soon introduce natural dyes for even more product groups.

Can every possible colour be achieved with natural dyes?

Although a very wide range of shades and intensities is possible with natural dyes – from pale yellow to orange, greens and blues – not every colour can be achieved. You can never get a very deep black, for example. Every dye producer has a colour chart to show the different options. The colours are a bit different from conventional colours, not as bright but rather powdery – which we like a lot. Naturally dyed denim can also react a bit differently when washed.

Which other eco-friendly dyeing treatments are used for Closed jeans?

Our Italian partner Candiani uses many different sustainable techniques to dye the denim for our jeans. One of them is prereduced indigo. Unlike conventional indigo, it does not require treatment with chemicals – it is already water-soluble and can be used directly for dyeing. 50 per cent less chemicals are needed and prereduced indigo meets the strict requirements of the Oeko-Tex® Standard 100 for textiles tested for harmful substances. It has the GOTS seal and complies with the new EU chemicals regulation REACH. Another example is the patented Kitotex® technology which upcycles waste products from the food industry for sizing the denim: mushrooms or the shells of shrimps. Sizing is the process of preparing the yarn for the dye, making it smooth, uniform and resistant. With the Kitotex® technology, the dyeing process needs 70 per cent less water, 50 per cent less chemicals and 30 per cent less energy than conventional methods. Thanks to the natural components, it is completely biodegradable and microplastic-free. The so-called easy-to-fade process is another dyeing innovation: the colour pigments do not penetrate as deeply into the yarn as in conventional processes, requiring 15 per cent less water and 15 per cent less energy in the denim manufacturing process. Since the dye is more likely to sit on the surface, it is easier to wash out again with industrial washing methods – saving even more water in the washing process that follows.

„Natural dyes are either mineral-based or plant-based.“

Denim Lexicon

There’s a “blue fact” in every HARD COPY – a little bit of denim knowledge to impress others with. This time: Dip

“Dip” describes the immersion baths cotton yarns repeatedly undergo during the dyeing process. Yarns must be exposed to air after each dip, because the true indigo colour only appears when it interacts with oxygen – it’s green before that. The more frequently these dips are repeated, the darker and more intense the colour. But: the fewer dips, the more eco-friendly. To lower the number of dips, we use the sustainable nitrogen dyeing process. How it works: the yarn passes through a chamber filled with nitrogen. Here, the nitrogen reacts with the colour pigment and intensifies the dyeing process. This technique reduces the number of colour baths the yarn has to pass through from seven to two, saving 30 per cent of the chemicals.

Organic Cotton

Text by Laura Reinke

On our BLUE PAGE, we inform you about all things denim. This time, we would like to highlight the most important ingredi-ent of (almost) every denim: cotton! We have been switching to organic cotton for the majority of our jeans within the last years, as it’s much more eco-friendly. By now, around two-thirds of our jeans for men and women are made with organic cotton. We asked our very own denim (and cotton!) expert Uwe Kippschnieder a couple of questions about the material.

Interview with denim expert Uwe Kippschnieder

Uwe Kippschnieder is Closed’s Denim Developer. He knows everything about denim – that’s why we call him our “walking denim lexicon” or simply refer to him as Dr. Denim. Uwe joined our company in 2002 and his passion for denim has been growing ever since. He is fascinated by sustainable denim innovations and is always pushing them vigorously for Closed. Inspired by his regular visits to weaving mills and laundries in Italy, he developed our eco-friendly denim line A BETTER BLUE with the clear message: style and eco-awareness can go hand in hand.

How is organic cotton produced in comparison to conventional cotton?

Organic cotton is produced and certified according to the guidelines and standards of organic farming – which means: neither genetically modified seeds nor toxic chemicals, pesticides and insecticides are used. Avoiding these chemicals protects our groundwater and biodiversity. In addition, mixed crops and crop rotation ensure the build-up of soil organic matter and prevent soil erosion. Compared to conventional cotton, the cultivation of organic cotton also requires about 80 per cent less water and about 60 per cent less energy. For all those reasons, organic cotton is a lot more sustainable. By using it for our jeans, including but not limited to our eco-denim line A BETTER BLUE, we gradually reduce our share of conventional cotton in order to protect the environment. Closed also uses organic cotton for a lot of other essentials – from shirts to hoodies.

Does denim made of organic cotton look or feel different?

No, it looks and feels the same as denim made with conventional cotton. It’s always our aim to make our A BETTER BLUE jeans as high-quality, on-trend and comfortable as the classic Closed denim.

Why isn’t every pair of Closed jeans made of organic cotton?

Well, not yet! But we’re getting closer. Unfortunately, due to the rising global demand and limited offers for organic cotton, it’s not always easy for our suppliers to get their hands on sufficient amounts. That’s why we’re gradually increasing the organic cotton in our collections. And by the way: we also use recycled cotton for our denim – another sustainable option.

Tell us more!

In every weaving mill, cotton residues accumulate during the production of fabrics. In the past, these were not used. These remnants are now mechanically processed and added to fresh cotton. The less virgin, conventional cotton we use, the more we can cut back on the water, energy and chemicals that would otherwise be needed to grow cotton.

„The less virgin, conventional cotton we use, the more we can cut back on the water, energy and chemicals that would otherwise be needed to grow cotton.“

Denim Lexicon

There’s a “blue fact” in every HARD COPY – a little bit of denim knowledge to impress others with. This time: Selvedge Denim

The term “selvedge” or “selvage” orig-inated in the sixteenth century and describes a fabric with a woven edge (= self edge). The self edge prevents a fabric from fraying and makes it possible to process it without further sewing. In the denim industry, the term selvedge has become synonymous with top-quality textiles. The most noticeable attribute of jeans made with selvedge denim is a woven edge located on the outer seam of the trouser leg, which indicates that this particular denim was woven on a narrower loom comparable to those in use at the turn of the century. This special weaving method makes the fabric more durable and authentic-looking. Today, ninety per cent of all selvedge denim is produced by the industry leaders Japan, Italy, and the USA. Besides distinctive weaving techniques, what makes selvedge denim exclusive is its producers’ (usually small mills) pride in their craft and passion for the product.

Eco Washing

Text by Laura Reinke

On our Blue Page, we write about all things denim. Our denim wouldn’t have its signature blue hues – from spring sky to dark navy – without elaborate wash treatments. Our denim laundries in Italy, Everest and Green Lab, focus on state-of-the-art sustainable techniques to save water, chemicals and energy – while creating every conceivable shade of blue. We talked to our denim expert Uwe Kippschnieder about the latest eco-friendly wash innovations.

Interview with denim expert Uwe Kippschnieder

Uwe Kippschnieder is Closed’s Denim Developer. He knows everything about denim – that’s why we call him our “walking denim lexicon” or simply refer to him as Dr. Denim. Uwe joined our company in 2002 and his passion for denim has been growing ever since. He is fascinated by sustainable denim innovations and is always pushing them vigorously for Closed. Inspired by his regular visits to weaving mills and laundries in Italy, he developed our eco-friendly denim line A BETTER BLUE with the clear message: style and eco-awareness can go hand in hand.

What new denim washes are you currently working on?

When it comes to denim washes, we are always working to reduce our environmental impact, i.e. using less water, chemicals and energy. For the upcoming seasons, we have set ourselves the goal of banning pumice stones (used for conventional stone-washing processes), PP spray (potassium permanganate) and other conventional bleaching agents from all our denim washes in order to save water, chemicals and electricity. We are working very closely with our Italian laundries Everest and Green Lab to achieve this goal – and are always excited to learn about their eco-friendly wash innovations.

Which new sustainable techniques are the laundries using as alternatives for conventional wash treatments?

Everest, our long-term partner from Piombino Dese, uses new “faux stones” instead of pumice for stone-washing. They had already been using eco stones, but the new generation is even more efficient and long-lasting. Pumice stone is very porous due to its open structure, it rubs off quickly during washing and loses substance. This results in sediments in the waste water – blue sludge which has to be disposed of as hazardous waste. This is completely avoided by using faux stones, which last up to 200 times longer. Another advantage: pumice is a finite resource, and most of the pumice used for the stone-washing process is mined in open pit mines. We can reduce this interference in nature by using the faux stones.

What else is new in the laundries?

Everest is also testing a new enzyme to achieve a medium light denim tone. The enzymes react with the colour pigments and lighten the denim fabric, much like the traditional stone-washing process. It’s quite fascinating: they put this enzyme powder in the washing machine along with the wet garments – and after 20 to 30 minutes, they come out a very nice mid-blue. There’s no need for stones, extra water or high temperatures. Another promising new technique: our laundry Green Lab from Grottammare has developed and patented a new method of applying chemicals during the wash process together with the chemical supplier Garmon. They now use a foam (called SmartFoam), which cuts down the impact by astonishing amounts: around 90 per cent fewer chemicals, 80 per cent less water and 40 per cent less energy. By the way, Green Lab (formerly known as Itac Lab) is the laundry with the biggest laser park – and they were the first laundry in Italy to start treating garments with lasers. It was not common back then, that’s why the first laser they used was a modified one from the automobile industry. Now they have the most precise high-definition lasers and are able to create various wash effects – even marble effects.

Can you explain how “washing” with lasers works? Why is this method eco-friendly?

Using lasers means “washing” with heat instead of chemicals: the targeted heat of the laser partially burns or breaks up the colour pigments so that the indigo can bleed in these areas during the subsequent wash. With modern, high-definition lasers that work with millimetre precision, it is possible to add practically any kind of pattern and fading to a pair of jeans. Fading and patterns are usually the lighter areas and they make the jeans look worn and lived-in. It’s even possible to create used-look effects such as small holes or other signs of wear. Unlike conventional washing methods this method requires no chemicals at all. Water consumption and the degree of manual processing are also lower than with conventional washing techniques.

Which other eco-friendly washing treatments are used for Closed jeans?

For very bright washing effects we are dependent on the use of oxidising agents. We always look for the most eco-friendly option – one good example is the low-impact oxidants our laundries use to replace conventional chemicals. Unlike peroxides or hyperoxides, this highly enriched oxygen formula leaves no residues in the water, which reduces the effort required for water treatment after washing and saves energy. We also wash with ozone, a naturally occurring gas. The ozone process is by far the most environmentally friendly form of “bleaching”. It requires no additional chemicals and has strong oxidising properties while being completely residue-free. After use, it is heated very slightly so that it breaks back down into oxygen and is released back into the air without any pollution. The consumption of water and energy is also significantly lower than with conventional processes.

„We also wash with ozone, a naturally occurring gas.“

Denim Lexicon

There’s a “blue fact” in every HARD COPY – a little bit of denim knowledge to impress others with. This time: Indigo

Indigo is a deep blue, crystalline, organic chemical compound. It’s used for dyeing cotton to make blue denim. Indigofera tinctoria was first planted and its leaves used to produce the colour indigo in India. Due to its laborious production indigo was nicknamed “blue gold” and “the colour of kings” (“royal blue”). In 1897, German company BASF introduced a synthetic indigo dye, which soon superseded natural indigo in the global marketplace.