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Gamme de tailles

Women
  • INT XXS XS S M L XL
    Poitrine
    (cm)
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    à
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  • INT XXS XS S M L XL
    GER 32 34 36 38 40 42
    US 0-2 4 6 8 10 12
    UK 6 8 10 12 14 16
    ITA 38 40 42 44 46 48
    FRA 34 36 38 40 42 44
    JAP 5 7 9 11 13 15
Men
  • INT XS S M L XL XXL
    Poitrine
    (cm)
    86
    à
    89
    90
    à
    93
    94
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    Taille
    (cm)
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    à
    76
    77
    à
    80
    81
    à
    84
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    89
    à
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    93
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    Hanches
    (cm)
    87
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    90
    91
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    95
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    98
    99
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    102
    103
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    106
    107
    à
    109
  • INT XS S M L XL XXL
    GER 44 46 48 50 52 54
    US 34 36 38 40 42 44
    UK 34 36 38 40 42 44
    ITA 44 46 48 50 52 54
    FRA 38 40 42 44 46 48
    JAP 1 2 3 4 5 6
  • CM 72 77 82 87 92
    INCH 28 30 32 34 36

    (Valeur approx.)

Talking
design’s social
responsibility
with Richard
van der Laken

Closed × Richard van der Laken

As interpreters of global change, designers adapt to social, political and cultural climate. By creating solutions not just for everyday use but social purposes, they are ubiquitously subjected to far-reaching challenges; some of which, according to What Design Can Do co-founder Richard van der Laken, governmental organizations rarely tackle. We talked to him about his goals.

Closed × Richard van der Laken
Closed × Richard van der Laken
Closed × Richard van der Laken Closed × Richard van der Laken
What Design Can Do (WDCD) aims high. Have you always had a strong vision?

When I started as a designer, I was still developing a vision. And I still am. How you look at things is something that constantly changes. As life does. Throughout my career as a graphic designer I have always been more interested in the impact of the things I make—the effect design has on people rather than the aesthetic side.

Is that what inspired the creation of WDCD?

I have always focused on concrete things. That’s what designers do. Translate ideas into something tangible. When the economic crisis hit the Netherlands in 2011, we were sort of out of work—a good reason to initiate something instead of waiting and sitting on your hands. I just wrote down a one-pager, invited some friends and design colleagues, we drank a lot of beer, had a conversation, and the rest is history!

How do you deal with the magnitude of the topics you address?

It’s important that you’re very aware and stay open; everything is about societal and environmental issues. Sometimes it’s also about beauty or poetry or fun. For us it’s important that it’s very energetic, that there is great fun and good energy because that’s the only way to address those issues. It doesn’t start with the societal issue; it starts with the fact that you want to make stuff and you have to use that energy and channel it in the right direction.

New Veste en cuir-velour

579 ¤

New Atelier Cropped Pants

  • Regular Fit / 
  • Eco Denim / 
  • 10.5 oz.
179 ¤

New Pullover en fine maille de laine mérino

149 ¤

+2 Couleurs

New Clifton Slim Chino

  • Slim Fit / 
  • Brushed Twill Structure / 
  • Garment Dyed
139 ¤

+6 Couleurs

New Manteau à carreaux en mélange laine

479 ¤

New Hoodie

139 ¤

New Button Down Shirt en Twill

139 ¤

+1 Couleur

New Boston Relaxed Chino

  • Relaxed Fit / 
  • Twill Structure / 
  • Japanese Fabric
179 ¤

+2 Couleurs

New Parka Shearling

1.500 ¤

Shirt manches longues en Slub Jersey

89 ¤

+2 Couleurs

New Button Down Shirt en Twill

139 ¤

+1 Couleur

Closed × Richard van der Laken
Closed × Richard van der Laken
Closed × Richard van der Laken Closed × Richard van der Laken
Your aim is to divide your work into three chapters; climate change, social justice, and health and wellbeing. Do you view them as separate entities?

It’s a methodology: We think we can have more impact if we focus on a few specific issues—within those we need to find our own specific identity. The topics are so huge, so omnipresent, that you have to make these choices to make it understandable again.

How does that approach take shape on the ground?

First and foremost, it includes a lot of research, interviews with experts, and workshop formats with experts, designers, and stakeholders. In Mexico City we dealt with waste and involved a local team with members of the municipality of Mexico City, designers, and experts in the realm of waste. With them we work out the real issues, and how we can translate that into issues that are relevant for designers.

Where do you see WDCD moving in the future?

I see a need to become a platform for designers and creatives in areas or countries that don’t have such a strong infrastructure as the Netherlands or Germany does. For example, we worked in Nairobi for the Clean Energy Challenge. There is no magazine, no events, or festivals; no infrastructure for these people. Of course, there are designers and creatives but there is no context. It is super difficult for them to use their skills and channel that creative energy in the right direction. In the long run, it would be great if WDCD could offer that to countries where it’s much more difficult than in developed countries.

Credits
Text: Ann-Christin Schubert
Photography: Jordi Huisman

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